The World War I doughboys of New York City

this is really awesome. I had no idea there were so many WWI doughboy memorials in NYC. I have the beginning of a nice day’s visit here. We’re in the 100th anniversary of WWI and I believe today is the anniversary of America joining that war. I also have a first cousin twice removed, Wesley Heffner, private 1st Class in Company B of the 26th Infantry who didn’t make it home from France. He died at twenty years old in 1918. It’s important to remember. Our memories give our dead renewed life and restore to us our roots.

Ephemeral New York

No one quite knows where the term “doughboy” originated.

Coined in the 19th century, it may have come from the doughnut-like buttons on soldier uniforms, or it might stem from their doughy rations.

But this nickname for the millions of American infantrymen (and thousands of New Yorkers) who fought in World War I endures—as do the bronze doughboy statues that were funded by veterans’ groups and ordinary citizens after the war’s end in November 1918.

With April 6 marking the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into what was then known as the European War, take a look at a few of the nine doughboy statues standing in city parks and corners.

At the top left is the doughboy of DeWitt Clinton Park in Hell’s Kitchen—an excerpt from war poem “In Flanders Fields” carved in granite below him.

The Abingdon Square doughboy, pistol at the…

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